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or the cause? plus, we're blowing the roof off the biggest nsa scandal yet. now we're learning the agency broke privacy rules. thousands of times per year. folks, this is going to blow your mind. and then -- >> this happy, happy, happy -- [ applause ] >> eric: he should be happy. he just won the lotto. wait until you hear what a majority of americans say they would do if they won. this is going to shock you. "cashin' in" uncompromising, defenders of freedom and capitalism starts right now. ♪ ♪ >> eric: hi, everybody. i'm eric bolling. welcome to "cashin' in". wane rogers, jonathan hoenig, bob beckel and star parker. welcome, everybody. first, the big cities and now the suburb. poverty papeful reality for one in five americans and that includes moms, dads and kids. in 1964, president johnson declared a national war on poverty. over the decade since, taxpayers funded a massive redistribution of wealth. in the year since that declared war, welfare spending is up 11,000%. spending on food stamps ballooned. 32,000%. with trillions of tax dollars diverted to combat and post officeerty, one would
, the nsa came underfire in the senate judiciary committee, republicans and democrats raising serious questions about the big phone spying program of nsa. we'll bring you up to date on that and a whole lot more right here on current tv. (vo) current tv gets the conversation started weekdays at 9 eastern. >> i'm a slutty bob hope. the troops love me. tv and radio talk show host stephanie miller rounds out current's morning news block. you're welcome current tv audience for the visual candy. (vo) sharp tongue. >>excuse me? (vo) quick wit. >> and yes, president obama does smell like cookies and freedom. (vo) and above all, opinion and attitude. >> really?! this is the kind of they just pulled freshly from their [bleep]. >> you know what those people are like. >> what could possibly go wrong in eight years of george bush? >> my producer just coughed up a hairball. >>sorry. >>just be grateful current tv doesn't come in "smell-o-vision" >> oh come on! the sweatshirt is nice and all, but i could use a golden lasso. (vo)only on current tv. cenk off air>>> alright in 15 minutes we're going to
king of new york. and the former c.i.a. and n.s.a. director general, michael hayden. plus, what's next for u.s.-russia relations now that the president has canceled his upcoming meeting with president putin? we'll have analysis from raj rajaratnam of the "washington post." eric schmitt of the "new york times." and cbs news state department correspondent margaret brennan. and we'll look at another story that rocked washington, the sale of the "washington post". we'll talk about the future of newspapers with former "washington post" editor len downie. former "new york times" editor bill keller. and john harris, editor in chief of politico. there's a lot to cover, but this is "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: and good morning again, michael hayden who served as both the c.i.a. and n.s.a. director now consulted for the cherdov group here in washington, joins us as our lead guest this morning. general, the president made that news conference on friday, and he said the american people need to know m
lawmakers are vowing more oversight amid a new report that the nsa routinely broke privacy rules in its controversial surveillance program. according to "the washington post," the nsa exceeded its legal authority thousands of times since 2008 with unauthorized surveillance of americans or foreign targets on u.s. soil. senate judiciary chairman pat leahy says he plans to hold another hearing on the nsa surveillance program. house speaker nancy pelosi called the report, quote, extremely disturbing in a statement saying in part, congress must conduct rigorous oversight to ensure that all incidents, all incidents of noncompliance are reported to the oversight committees and the fisa court in a timely and comprehensive manner and that appropriate steps are taken to ensure violations are not repeated. the report stems from an nsa audit obtained by the post from leaker edward snowden. kelly o'donnell joins me now. what kind of privacy violations are we talking about? >> what we're learning so far, these are not instances of eavesdropping on conversations or reading e-mails. it's not that kind
had more questions than ever and when the head of the n.s.a. spoke to a cyber security conference he gotten a enexpected reaction from just underlined the growing skepticism about the agency's methods. here's homeland security bobrespondent bob orr. >> how do we defend this country? >> reporter: as n.s.a. chief .eith alexander was defending nge government's data collection ollectms at a cyber security conference in las vegas, he was egasrrupted by hecklers. interrupted by hecklers. >> i haven't lied to congress. >> reporter: intelligence officials are also feeling pressure from a skeptical congress. democrat patrick leahy is the chairman of the senate judiciary committee. >> so what's going to be next? when is enough enough? i think congress has to carefully consider the powerful surveillance tools that we grant to the government. >> reporter: to ease some of the fears, the obama administration today declassified three top- secret documents detailing the n.s.a.'s mass collection of u.s. phone records. a surveillance program first revealed by edward snowden. this is the april, 2013, o
news conference since april 30th. he touched on a number of topics, including the nsa, surveillance, privacy, snowden, putin, drone strike, obama karks republicans shutting down the government, benghazi, the next fed chair, immigration, and the olympics. here are some highlights. >> i wanted to ask you about your evolution on the surveillance issues. why should the public trust you on this issue? >> where we can prevent a terrorist attack, where we can get information ahead of time that we're able to carry out that critical task. >> is he a patriot? you just used those words. >> no, i don't believe he's a patriot. >> do you believe al qaeda has been decimated? >> al qaeda is on its heals, has also been decimated and what else i said is they have me as the ta sized into regional groups that can pose significant dangers. >> september 11th will be the first anniversary of benghazi and you said on september 12th, make no mistake, we'll bring justice to those people. where are they? >> i also said we'll get bin laden and i didn't get him in 11 months. >> i thought he did do a very good j
the broom when he got to the precinct? >> oh -- >> my a block was so good. i got beckeled. >>> is the nsa spying scandal dividing the gop? some say it is reaching a boiling point. that's next on "the five." ♪ right now, 7 years of music is being streamed. a quarter million tweeters are tweeting. and 900 million dollars are changing hands online. that's why hp built a new kind of server. one that's 80% smaller. uses 89% less energy. and costs 77% less. it's called hp moonshot. and it's giving the internet the room it needs to grow. this&is gonna be big. hp moonshot. it's time to build a better enterprise. together. i had my reality check when i'd be sitting there with my friends who had their verizon phones, and theirs would be going, and i'd be sitting there like "mine's still loading!" they would always say, "oh we never have issues like that." that was it! i was over it. i migrated over and i'm completely happy. i absolutely love verizon. i would never go back. verizon's 4g lte is the most reliable, and in more places than any other 4g network. period. that's powerful. verizon. get t
good. i got beckeled. >>> is the nsa spying scandal dividing the gop? some say it is reaching a boiling point. that's next on "the five." ♪ could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. mmmhmmm...everybody knows that. well, did you know that old macdonald was a really bad speller? your word is...cow. cow. cow. c...o...w... ...e...i...e...i...o. [buzzer] dangnabbit. geico. fifteen minutes could save you...well, you know. [ male announcer ] when the a.c. goes out in a heat wave, it's nuccio heating and air conditioning that comes to the rescue. at&t helped nuccio put a complete mobile solution to work. mobile routing to send the closest technician and mobile payments to invoice on the spot. where do you want to take your business? call us. we can show you how at&t solutions can help you do what you do... even better. ♪ ♪ >>> "the washington post" blew the nsa snooping scandal wide open in a scathing expose', they implicated obama administration, so embarrassed, obama administration leaned on "the washington post" to pull back the story. listen to rand paul call out the go
, who the hell has the time? we report it. you decide. >>> have you ever dated an nsa worker? before he seems into you, let's say he knows everything about you. could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. yep, everybody knows that. well, did you know some owls aren't that wise? don't forget i'm having brunch with meghan tomorrow. who? meghan, my coworker. who? seriously? you've met her like three times. who? (sighs) geico. fifteen minutes could save you...well, you know. ♪ the middle of this special moment and i need to run off to the bathroom. ♪ i'm fed up with always having to put my bladder's needs ahead of my daughter. ♪ so today, i'm finally talking to my doctor about overactive bladder symptoms. [ female announcer ] know that gotta go feeling? ask your doctor about prescription toviaz. one toviaz pill a day significantly reduces sudden urges and accidents, for 24 hours. if you have certain stomach problems or glaoma, or can not empty your bladd, you should not take toviaz. get emergency medical help right away if your face, lips, throat or tongue swells. toviaz
're basically getting a newhe roommate, the nsa, and you cann kiss the 4th amendment good-bye. we know companies like microsoft are willing to cooperate with nsa. a if you report says local law l enforcement agencies are taking information surveillance fromsa the nsa and arresting americans because of that surveillance. what you're doing is inviting the government into your home. that, to me, is very dangerous. >> wayne, you have to be careful what you wear when you're watching tv. they might flip the switch and v watch you right back? >> that's true. and i agree.hey it's a terrible thing to have the government watching you for anything. federal geet the government out of awful our lives. however, nobody is forcing you once again to buy that particular television that has a that camera in it.at c it's like buying a gun. you know a gun can kill somebody, might even kill you if you own the gun. so you got to be careful.n. so if you buy that television that has that camera, you're taking that risk. you don't have to -- wayne -- nobody is forcing you, but you buy the tv with the expectation thatpect
. it was the chairman of the judiciary committee, your colleague, senator leahy, who said wait a minute, i know the nsa tells us 54 plots in one way or another have been this wartded because of the program senator chambliss is refeing to, he says that's a bit of an joef statement, and he said it in open testimony this week. listen. >> open testimony is section 215 to thwart or prevent 54 terrorist plots. not by any stretch can you get 54 terrorist plots. this program is not effective. it has to end. so far i'm not convinced by what i've seen. >> do you agree with that? >> we had a meeting in the white house, saxby and i attended it with the president. there were about ten of us, democrats and republicans, from the house and the senate, and we spent an hour and a half in the president in the oval office, an hour and a half going over this nsa, debating it back and forth. the nsa 215 program that we're talking about here is a program on domestic surveillance. in other words, do we need to collect all of the phone records of all of the people living in america for five years so that if we're going to targ
comments. nsa picked up some chatter. it is about time they got back into the business they are supposed to be in. secondly, al-qaeda has made it a point for years now not to use cell phones phones and other communications. dana made a point that maybe they are desperate now. my guess is some of this may have been to throw us off. the third thing is if we hadn't closed the embassies and something happened, you would have been all over us as a result. the last thing i will say to you is embassies have been closed for the last 75 years as various circumstances have dictated. this may be more than most closures, but it goes back to teddy roosevelt. i would not consider this to be an american weakness. >> i agree. >> and the other thing is the yemens are not this rogue agent and our research here is clearly a guy who is upset in the right winger. >> it is like the bar scene and where they hang out. that's the deal. >> let me ask you. critics of the nsa would say this is really convenient for this to happen. while these programs are under fire and snowden is embarrassing us and now we can say
in the ongoing debate over the nsa surveillance programs. >> this is, to me, a direct consequence from what we saw in benghazi and the general program that this administration has, which is not being aggressive. >> the good news is that we picked up intelligence. that's what we do. that's what nsa does. >> michael crowley joins us live. michael, thanks for your time here. >> thanks. >> obviously, we didn't hear a lot of some of the partisan bickering we've grown sadly accustomed to. nevertheless, it was still there over the sunday morning programs. >> sure, we've seen this now for a decade. when you have a terrorist event or a major alert, people rush in with their agendas. you know, and it's interesting. i thought rick santorum's criticism in particular was kind of off base. he was saying that the president is timid about calling islamic terrorism -- about using the word terror. rhetorically, he's gone soft on this stuff. the reality is we have waged a really aggressive drone campaign in yemen to the point there's a lot of concern that the drones are doing more damage with public opinion than
the next shoe to drop is. i'm martha maccallum. the nsa reportedly intercepted calls from americans on american soil. many times they say it was by accident. sometimes an area code was a mix-up between egypt and washington, d.c. but either way, when these mistakes were made, although we've been told that the government tried to be as transparent as possible, nobody was told that those mistakes were made and the information that we got in this report from the "washington post" last night comes from edward snowden, the man who leaked the initial information about the nsa program and now has temporary asylum in russia. bill: funny how that works, huh? senior white house foreign affairs correspondent wendell goler is on vacation with the president at martha's vineyard. actually wendell's working. the president is on vacation. what's the white house saying about this, wendell? >> reporter: the white house appears to have been blindsided by this sorry. officials are referring reporters to the national security agency and to senate intelligence committee chair dianne feinstein who says in
, now we're learning nsa broke privacy rules thousands of times per years. this is going to blow your mind. and then -- >> just happy, happy, happy. thank you. [ applause ] >> and he should be happy. he just won the lotto. but wait till you hear what a majority of americans say they would do if they won. this is going to shock you. "cashin' in," defenders of freedom and capitalism, starts right now. hi, everybody. welcome to "cashin' in." our crew this week -- welcome, everybody. first, it was the big cities and now the suburbs. poverty is a painful reality for nearly 1 in 5 americans, including moms, dads and kids. in 1964, president johnson declared a war on poverty. over the decades since, taxpayers have funded a massive redistribution of wealth. in the years since that declared war, welfare spending is up 11,000%. and spending on food stamps has ballooned 32,000%. with trillions of tax dollars to combat poverty, one would think poverty levels would fall. the exact opposite is happening. american poverty has exploded to 15.9%, and there's more. america's biggest suburbs are now hom
america's underpants. i wonder what our prison cells will look like when the nsa has us all arrested for thought crime. that's spectacular. [ applause ] >> that's a huge conspiracy theory. that's like way off the reservation. >> stephanie: that and a few burns and we're ready to go. >> we need to pad captain america's underpants. >> stephanie: who got to teach spinning class yesterday? who was on the big girl bike? >> i didn't teach it but the instructor is injured and she asked me to ride for her yesterday. >> stephanie: i could not be prouder of our little girl. [ ♪ magic wand ] >> it is a lot of pressure to be up on that platform. >> did you tell her that was weakness leaving the body? >> my weakness leaving the body. >> stephanie: very proud of you. here she is, noted spinning instructor, jacki schechner. >> stop it. please. good morning, everybody. if you were early to bed and early to rise like we are, you may have missed the president's appearance on "the tonight show" last night. jay leno got pretty serious with president obama asking him questions about everything from hi
that and putting it up. taking anything out of republican national convention. >> all right. >>> coming up. new nsa spying revelations, some workers at the clandestine agency admit their snooping has extended to their love interests. that's romantic. who hasn't done this. eric hacked twitter for pickup lines which he will unveil just ahead. ♪ hi, i'm terry and i have diabetic nerve pain. i worked a patrol unit for 17 years in the city of baltimore. when i first started experiencing the pain, it's, it's hard to describe because you have a numbness... but yet you have the pain like thousands of needles sticking in your foot. it was progressively getting worse, and at that point i knew i had to do something. when i went back to my healthcare professional... that's when she suggested the lyrica. once i started taking the lyrica, the pain started subsiding. [ male announcer ] it's known that diabetes damages rves. lyrica is fda approved to treat diabetic nerve pain. lyrica is not for everyone. it may cause serious allergic reactions or suicidal thoughts or actions. tell your doctor right away if you h
has information on the nsa spying scandal we were talking about. you want to stick around for that. >>> which one of us five has the messiest office? the producers took snapshots today. you're going to find out. it is not mine. we're taking a fun trip back in time later, hope you'll join us. we'll be back in a minute. [ male announcer ] want healthy joints?° ♪ the joint is jumpin' osteo bi-flex® helps strengthen your joints.° like calcium supplements can help your bones, osteo bi-flex can help your joints.° osteo bi-flex... the best stuff in the joint.™ now in joint and muscle formula. the best stuff in the joint.™ she loves a lot of it's what you love about her. but your erectile dysfunction - that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms obph, like needing to go frequently or urgently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medications, and ask you
for myself over the weekend. first of all, let me make a few comments. nsa picked up some chatter. it is about time nsa got back to the business they're supposed to be in. secondly, al qaeda has made a point for years now not to use cell phones and other communications. dana made a point before the show maybe they're desperate. my guess is some of it may be just to throw us off. the third thing, if we hadn't closed embassies and something happened, you all would be all over it. and the last thing i will say, embassies have been closed the last 75 years as circumstances dictate. this may be more closures, goes to teddy roosevelt when they closed some. i would not consider this american weakness. and also the yemens, not rogue or research, clearly upset, right winger. >> the bar scene is where all of the freaks hang out. that's the deal. >> dana, critics at the nsa would say this is really convenient for this to happen while the programs are under fire and snowden is embarrassing us, now we can come say look at all that we uncovered. >> i am uncomfortable talking about intelligent t
of the nsa program? >> of all things on his plate, snowden leaks, the question of what does nsa do and what is surveillance about, politically had a bigger impact than the other various controversy. some argue are politically driven and others more serious than that. this one had the actual impact when you look at the polls it's that's where you see skepticism rising among particularly among folks under the age of 40 who spent a lot of time online and he has been getting a lot of advice, the president has, from outside advisers saying you have to be more public in explaining and if your going to defend and in defending. create more transparency and do these things. you have to get out there and explain these programs because you're taking on water on this topic with a group of voters and a group of americans who are inclined to be supportive of you on other things. you can't afford to lose another piece of the american electorate because you have other things you have to push. >> and this comes after congressional leaders met with him for 90 minutes ten days ago. they told him that there ha
to you. >> about time. thank you very much. >>> let's talk about the nsa. another revelation came out yesterday afternoon and it turns out that they have -- they have released additional information over the past -- since 2008 on things that have gone wrong in the nsa collection. for example, there was a redacted page which is unredacted and classified yesterday that revealed that we have collected 56,000 wholly domestic communications each year. so this is done, nothing was necessarily done with it. nothing was exposed by it. but these were collected and the fisa court judge did not know about it and he rebuked the nsa for doing that and they said they were unintentional errors. >> we have been talking for a while about the nsa, how they're saying trust us, we're not doing anything illegal. the stuff that was declassified yesterday said they didn't break some laws. they violated -- the nsa violated the constitution three times in three years. violated the constitution because they did as brian said go through our e-mails, domestic e-mails, rather than just the foreign stuff. remember
from russia granting asylum to n.s.a. leaker edward snowden. >> russia has stabbed us in the back and each day that snowden is allowed to roam free is another twist of the knife. >> schieffer: we'll hear from new york democrat chuck schumer and we'll talk with house budget committee chairman paul ryan. plus analysis from the "washington post's" dan balz, author of the new book "collision 2012." peggy noonan of the "wall street journal." barton gellman of "time" magazine and the "washington post." david sanger of the "new york times," and cbs news political director john dickerson. a lot to cover, but it's what we do on "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: and good morning again. well, we're getting more details this morning on why the government has closed those 22 american diplomatic posts across the middle east and north africa, and why they are taking so seriously the threat of a possible al qaeda attack. the travel warning that the state department issued last week for americans travelin
to talk about the nsa, russia, trayvon martin, hillary clinton 2016. the barriers, the way that we think about what slots fit in the media and how politicians use those, i don't think the obama white house thinks in those. i frankly don't think a lot of people who consume what we do think in those terms. i think this is a reflection of that. >> not at all. jay asked very good questions, jonathan. this was another example because there was so much news out there that the president has not been heard on. >> i'm sorry, andrea. i thought you were talking to cliff. in picking up on what chris was talking about. the president fielding questions from a late night talk show host instead of the white house press core, the president is not only picking his interviewer but picking his awed yejs. he's trying to leap frog us in the media and washington media and talking to the american people directly. in your intro the president will probably do a press conference before he goes on vacation, so i think what the president is doing is sort of an all approach. we'll talk to the press core in the white
latest on the nsa leaker and his life ahead. >> hi, there, mara. edward snowden has, it would appear, settled into his new russian life as quietly as he spent most of his almost six weeks ined is that transit zone inside moscow's airport. so quiet, in fact, that some paparazzi and journalists who were apparently stalking him all that time are calling it anticlimatic. the only information we're actually getting about snowden is coming from his lawyer anatoly kucherena. he found a place to stay, an undisclosed location in moscow. he is keen to learn the russian language and culture and looking, according to kucherena, for a job as a human rights activist. he's also giving up, apparently, on the idea of seeking asylum in any latin american country. that means that he's probably taking the advice of his father, lonnie snowden who told me in an interview we did on thursday from washington, d.c., that if he were his son, he would stay here in russia and make a life of it because it's a strong country, he said, that could resist extreme u.s. pressure to actually to hand his son over to face
is at the courthouse. bob orr on russia granting asylum to n.s.a. leaker edward snowden. major garrett has white house reaction. that cyclospora outbreak has made hundreds sick, but where is it coming from? >> i don't know what to buy. i don't where to go eat. >> schieffer: dr. jon lapook has the latest on the investigation. and this was a six-year-old when he came to america. this is him now. elaine quijano on how an afghan boy got his childhood back. uijaw captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. this is the "cbs evening news" wi >> schieffer: good evening. scott's on assignment. i'm bob schieffer. three young women were held captive for a decade in a dilapidated cleveland house where they were repeatedly raped and abused. but ariel castro, the man who pleaded guilty to the crime, said today it was everybody's fault but his and claimed the women were actually happy. judge michael russo was not convinced. he sentenced castro to life in prison without parole, plus 1,000 years. dean reynolds is at the courthouse. >> reporter: a shackled ariel castro scanned the cour
. it is like every day there is something new that the nsa admits to. now they are looking at the texts of our e-mails. so if i send an e-mail to a server offseas it happens to be offseas now i'm technically they are allowed to look into my ee-mail. they can now read them. >> i'm out of here. >> so when you are doing anything illegal they are searching for a pattern. i have been a defender of them based on congress asked them to do it. i trust them. everything that i have read that the they are talking to somebody overs overseas. >> after they said they wanted to have a national dialogue about it. i have a chance tomorrow. >> the interview he gave. was jay leno a comedian. this is something people were really ticked off about. >> when obama care was a big issue in 2010 it was on the floor of the house and the senate. there is absolutely no evidence of obama care being an issue. >> it is an issue at town halls. it may or may not work. >> there is frustration especially when it comes to the waiver. what do you think he should say when he has a press conference -- hopefully he will get questions.
these programs as possible. we have already declassified unprecedented information about the nsa. but we can go further. so at my direction the department of justice will make public the legal rational for the government's collection activities under section 215 of the patriot act. the nsa is taking steps to put in place a full-time civil liberties and privacy officer. and released information that details its mission, authorities and oversight. and finally the intelligence community is creating a web site that will serve as a hub for further transparency. and this will give americans and the world the ability to learn more about what our intelligence communities does and what it doesn't do; how it carries out its mission; and why it does so. fourth, we're forming a high-level group of outside experts to review our entire intelligence communications technologies. we need new thinking for a newera. we now have to unravel terrorist plots by finding a needle in a hey stake of global telecommunications. and meanwhile technology has given governments, including our own, unprecedented capability to m
and is not different from our concerns about the nsa. it is not different from our concerns about the racial profiling. and now the idea that simply because of someone's class status which is what we're talking about here means you should be fingerprinted and that, just saying we want to do this for the record, we want to do this to prevent crime. he is making a presumption poor people should be kept as a kind of preemptive device so we know eventually you will commit crime and we'll have you on the record then. so it goes against the presumption of innocence. it goes against the 4th amendment and is really stunning he was able to stand up and make that statement. >> my guests, a big thanks to both of you for being with me. don't forget new york police commissioner ray kelly will be david gregory's guest tomorrow on nbc's "meet the press." check your local listings. >>> a witness to history. the fight for civil rights told through the eyes of a black butler in the white house. we are going to talk to the journalist whose reporting inspired the movie and best selling book. >> wow. amazing. thank you so
stories based on the national security agency documents leaked by n.s.a. contractor edward snowden vowed today to publish new revelations about britain's espionage system. because british police detained his companion, david miranda, at london's heathrow airport and questioned him for nine hours. greenwald implied he knew many secrets about british intelligence and said authorities would regret detaining his partner. a cbs news correspondent john miller who is a former assistant director of the f.b.i. is on the case for us. john, what do you make of this? >> well, one question was did the brits do this on their own or were they acting on behalf of the united states and the white house acknowledged today that they were given advance word that this stop was going to happen. in another way, bob, it almost doesn't matter. you have to understand the way that u.s. intelligence and british intelligence work together. particularly the n.s.a. and their counterpart in great britain, the g.c.h.q. it's almost seamless. they have a morning conference call. they divide up the tarring hes, they work on
. it was another leak of stolen documents by former n.s.a. contractor edward snowden that revealed top secret telephone and internet surveillance programs. and today, the n.s.a. tried to clear the air by declassifying a secret court opinion showing how it unlawfully scooped up as many as 56,000 e-mails and other communications of people in the united states between 2008 and 2011. n.s.a. officials say the americans were not deliberately targeted. they say technical issues were to blame and new safeguards were put in place. we know more tonight about the gunman who terrorized an elementary school in decatur, georgia, yesterday-- michael brandon hill. fortunately, no one was injured. the 911 tapes were released today. on them, you will hear school bookkeeper antoinette tufs. here's mark strassmann. >> reporter: suspect michael brandon hill took this photo of himself holding what police believe is the same ak-47 that he sneaked in to the elementary school yesterday afternoon. in the main office, the 20-year- old confronted a school employee who called 911. you can hear hill giving orders to polic
that law enforcement officials are getting trained that once they get these tips from nsa surveillance and other places they should cover up that the information they got came from any of those surveillance programs. they should, instead, pretend they got the information through traditional legal law enforcement means. they should launder the source of the information. these guys did not get the information through traditional law enforcement means they got it from the thing we've all been thinking they're only using against terrorists except they're supposed to be pretending otherwise. eek. joining us now is john schiffman. it is his reporting that brought this program to light. thank you very much for being with us tonight. >> thanks for having me. >> how does the dea, a domestic law enforcement agency in this operating this context have access to this information that is only supposed to be about foreigners? how does this work? >> well, there are four ways that the special operations division which is a unit of dea gets this information. the first way they get it is through passed a
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 131 (some duplicates have been removed)